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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: May 10, 2007 10:10am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Long Strange McNally

His and Parish's are the only two I think I haven't read. Sounds like similar treatment that Phil gave if he ignores the last two decades. To me it's kind of disappointing because drug problems or not I think the band acheived some very high musical heights 87-91. I saw many a show where they were all smiles and didn't look at all like they were going through the motion. To hear Phil tell it he must not have enjoyed anything after 69. I shit you not probably 2/3 or more of the book only goes through 67-68. I don't think he even mentions 77, let alone 72-74. While all of you 77 lovers think about that I'm still wondering about the wall of sound years. I mean hell, as obviously important the 60's were to his and everyone's spiritual consciousness, was he sleeping during the years they created their most flawless shows?

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: May 10, 2007 12:28pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Long Strange McNally

Focusing on the early years stems more from the idea that the greatest excitement in any explosion is the beginning--the formation, the coming together of elements, a time that came and went by too quickly, youth, energy, adventure, creation, the NEW, experiments, closeness, wildness, discovery, possibility. Think 1964--before long hair emerged. Before the word Hippie. Before Life Magazine. A very small group of people who launched quite a few rockets. The intersection of time and place that is so rate. The birth of the Dead is simply more interesting than the mid life crises. All those places and faces--the Avalon, the Carousel, the Fillmores. Acid, incense and balloons. The supernova that was Dark Star. Then, respectability. Tours, endless tours. Merhandise, stadiums, BMWs, heroin.

Almost all great artists are at their most intriguing before the hit the big times, before they are known, before they succumb to fame and start to burn out. Dylan, Springsteen, Clapton--poets and novelists. When were Vonnegut's best books written? Before he was a household name.

Ah, the old days--the good old days--the good old grateful dead.

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: May 10, 2007 1:08pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Long Strange McNally

I understand what you're saying Ghost but don't you still think it's odd to have 80% of the bands career not even mentioned? Did you read Phil's book? I mean Europe 72, 73-74, 77, etc. not even mentioned at all? I understand about youth and the social phenomina the 60's must have been but then why not write a book about the Dead in the 60's instead of just throwing less than table scraps at the rest?

Besides, I've heard the story of how they were formed so many times I could recite it in my sleep.

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Poster: ghostofpig Date: May 10, 2007 4:19pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Short Strange McNally

I think it's odd--sure--or at least disappointing--even though I'm an early deadhead. But somehow I feel that even scrib found the early tale to be more interesting and more mythic in stature. The later years are not likely filled with the same TYPE of tales, and a good many of the tales that are around aren't very flattering. More the National Enquirer sort of stuff. Sure--I'd love to read much more about things on Shakedown Street--about Le Club Front and how this or that came to be--what Jerry's return from the grave was like, or even more about side projects--but from a sales point of view, they must have felt that it was the good ol' days that intrigued the most.

Geeze--thirty years AND an aftermath--should have been two volumes.

Even at that, I wish there was more detail about the early days--about Pig, about others in the circle, about Janis, and Jorma, about . . . . everything!!!

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: May 10, 2007 4:29pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Short Strange McNally

Hey Ghost, have you read that book called " summer of love" by Joel Selvin? Kinda jumps around a lot but there's a few interesting ones in there. Little too much focus on Janis imo but worth reading.

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Poster: amosearle Date: May 10, 2007 1:14pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Long Strange McNally

I'll make a point of reading Phils' book now, with your post. I think Mr. Lesh may have been saving some for either another book or for keeping his less happy opinions to himself... McNally Quotes him as summarizing 1978 as " I was drunk in '78". He may not have wanted to talk about the wife and kid years, or the liver transplant days in the book, since we all get that when he visits... As us Southern Boys were raised "Say something nice, or don't say nothing at all..." :)

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: May 10, 2007 1:23pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Long Strange McNally

no, he covers his drinking and meeting his wife, and having kids, and his liver transplant. It just was odd to me that allmost nothing happened between 1970 and 1995

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Poster: bluedevil Date: May 10, 2007 1:39pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Long Strange McNally

well, isn't that what some listerners hear repeatedly stress?

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: May 10, 2007 1:40pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Long Strange McNally

yeah, I thought the same thing. Oh well, I can find much to like in allmost every year BUT some to me are obviously more inspired than others. Regardless of whether the Europe 72 tour is less adventurous or aggresive than 68-69, it is still a masterpiece of pure American music imo. If I had to choose then I much prefer the more mature well rounded stuff than just the balls to the wall hit you over the head approach. But I'm kind of a song guy, not just the avant gard stuff. Just like the Jazz I like, I like the stuff that is centered around a framework or melody and then goes out from there, rather than just pure aggression or speed.

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Poster: bluedevil Date: May 10, 2007 1:51pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Long Strange McNally

I'm with you there... Last night listend to Coltrane's My Favorite Things (was there ever a better band - Elvin and McCoy) and then followed with Wilco's A Ghost Is Born. Both on headphone while working away til midnight. I have a feeling you would understand those musical choices...

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: May 10, 2007 2:05pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Long Strange McNally

While the Coltrane 'My Favorite Things' is without doubt one of the finest performances ever recorded Phil and Friends also laid down an outstanding version - hell you probably already know it, but if you don't, feast your ears.

http://www.archive.org/details/1999-04-17.paf.sbd.ejade.6415.sbeok.flacf

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Poster: rastamon Date: May 10, 2007 2:27pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Long Strange McNally

that 4/17/99 Phil & Friends is an awesome show, Trey & Page from Phish, Steve Kimock...Outside, folks were waving $100bills trying to get a ticket. It was a very special night at the Warfield

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: May 10, 2007 2:49pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Long Strange McNally

It's one of my favourite shows - so many good things going on there. The power of the music comes across in the recording but to have actually been there to witness it must have been absolutely amazing.

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Poster: bluedevil Date: May 10, 2007 2:18pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Long Strange McNally

They do indeed. I saw the version of Phil and Friends with Robben Ford and Paul Barrere and Billy Payne of Little Feat play with Dylan at Shoreline in 99/00? Anyway, they did a fantastic version of the same.

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: May 10, 2007 1:56pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Long Strange McNally

I understand 110% my friend! Love both those choices. I really love the Miles stuff too, those four albums on Prestige are some of my favorites - Relaxin, Cookin, Steamin, Workin.

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Poster: amosearle Date: May 10, 2007 1:07pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Long Strange McNally

Thanks for the input, neighbors. It seems we pretty much agree, and some interesting tidbits are out there to still stir us up a bit. Now that I'm older I don't think Scully's book would hold much entertainment value...

I started Harrison's book long ago, but never finished it. Now that I've got this one done I may enjoy another run at it. If I can't find it in the Cinnamon Roll section at Border's I'll just get it at the Library.

Thanks also to Ghost of Pig.. a good summary.

I'm off to go nuts in Western NC for a long weekend... may even get to see Arlo before I'm back home.

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